Housebound advice from a long-term housebound person, boosts ok 

I'm going to post a long thread on how to cope better if you're stuck indoors at the moment. I've been housebound by disability for a long while now, and sporadically housebound due to depression and agoraphobia before that. These are things that have improved how I deal with that. This is not gonna make houseboundness painless for you but it might help you cope. Disabled comrades are welcome to share their own advice to this thread.

Housebound advice, mental health 

Firstly, most importantly: you are being asked to simulate the lifestyle of a severely depressed person and because of that you are going to start experiencing symptoms of depression. It’s helpful to recognise when you’re having episodes of this – i.e. consciously think “ah shit why am I feeling so terrible right now? –> it’s because I’m having depression -> time to look after myself”. […]

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Housebound advice, mental health 

If you have or have had depression, you might have coping mechanisms in place to deal with this. If this is new to you, there’s a lot of good advice floating around online for dealing with depression. It’s important to notice when this is happening to you, because being conscious of it is a first step in dispelling it. […]

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Housebound advice 

Next: time is going to get weird. Days are going to blend into each other. Your body-clock is going to be deprived of a lot of the physiological cues you get from going outside and having a routine. You’re going to need to artificially supplement or recreate the cues you would normally get, and also increase your exposure to any outside cues available. […]

Housebound advice 

So there’s three important ways to deal with this that I’m going to elaborate on in the next few posts:
- Reinforce your day-night cycle
- Set yourself a permissive routine and stick to it
- Keep your places separate.

These all ultimately aim to do variations on the same thing: compartmentalise your behaviours into different contexts to prevent everything from blurring into one interminable slog. […]

Housebound advice 

Reinforce your day-night cycle.
Your body responds to sunlight, and uses it to calibrate when it thinks day / night is. If you’re stuck indoors you’re going to get less of this effect, even if you have sunlight coming in. You’re going to have to set yourself an artificial day-night cycle. One of the worst things for depression is to feel like one day bleeds into the next with restless sleep in between – so the goal is to make daytime feel as different from nighttime as possible.

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Housebound advice 

@alex something you can do to help this is install an app on your phone or computer which dims the screen and makes it redder during the evening. I use one of these and I find it reduces the glare and makes it more comfortable to use devices in the evening.

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