@jwildeboer EUPL closes the network use loophole in a similar manner, EUPL is not viral, though. It's sort of "LAGPL".

@Steinar @jwildeboer can we not use the word "viral" to describe "copyleft"?

It's a Microsoft-invented term to make copyleft licenses sound bad.

Language matters.

@rysiek @Steinar @jwildeboer I think it's about time to start using good sounding terms indeed.

I heard once:
copyleft = forever-open
permissive = temporarily-open

@t0k @rysiek @jwildeboer We need a word for the LGPL category too. LGPL can't be "swallowed" like BSD, but can be used as an integral part of a closed system.

@Steinar @rysiek @jwildeboer I think LGPL qualifies as forever-open too. It just allows that a closed-source ecosystem grows around.

@t0k @Steinar @rysiek @jwildeboer
>I think LGPL qualifies as forever-open too
>as forever-open too
>open
I have to interject on this, what you are calling open may refer to open-source, which is completely different from what rms/fsf transmits with software freedom, or alternatively named free/libre software.
https://www.gnu.org/philosophy/open-source-misses-the-point.en.html

>It just allows that a closed-source ecosystem grows around.
LGPLv* licensed code permits the usage of it in proprietary code BUT the company/developers cannot restrain people from asking/getting the source code/modifications made in the said LGPLv* licensed code which is distributed with the proprietary code.
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@mangeurdenuage @rysiek @jwildeboer How about 'forever-libre', 'forever-free'?

As I understand free/libre implies forever-open but not the other way.

So there could be a forever-open license which for instance forbids the use of the code. It would be open but not free.

Does go along with your argument?

@t0k @Steinar @rysiek @jwildeboer
>So there could be a forever-open license which for instance forbids the use of the code. It would be open but not free.
That's the openCore model, as far as I know it is mainly used by the unreal engine. A very scum like license.

The license gives too much power to the copyright owner.
The copyright owner can forbid people from using a said code in certain ways, for example if you create an adult game an it displeases you, you have legally require them to stop distribution of it.
Such power goes against Freedoms 2 and 3.
@t0k @mangeurdenuage @rysiek @jwildeboer free/libre/open do not have technical differences in this context, the definitions for a free or open license are effectively the same.

The difference is to which greater context you are signaling belonging, the corporate-oriented (open) or the user-oriented (free/libre).
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