@Edent
To sell it to telemarketers for number-spoofing purposes.

@Edent @enkiv2 to be fair this won't work in the UK - mobile telephones have their own separate place in the numbering plan (the numbers all start with 07) unlike USA where for some reason they sit within the rest of the geographic numbering plan.

Most people here do not answer or respond to calls/texts from a strange number anyway (or even one from an area code way outside of your town) and block or let the call go to voicemail.

@vfrmedia @enkiv2 when you say "most people" do you have any data?

I worked at a large UK telco. The majority of people *do* answer all calls.

@Edent @enkiv2

Only from endusers of various phones at work.

Its correct they might answer a call *once*, but if its a repeated silent or obvious junk call with known caller ID its soon enough ignored or blocked.

Younger people with mobile phones do tend to be more wary of strange numbers.

there is the issue public sector and healthcare withold their outbound CLID so people often feel they *have* to answer these calls, but an unexpected mobile CLID is less likely to work for most scams >

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@Edent @enkiv2

all the recent ones I've seen coming in at work always use fixed geographical numbers (presumably obtained from sketchier VOIP providers).

I'm literally about to blacklist a number now I've had notified for multiple silent calls..

SMS spam originated from mobile numbers was certainly a thing for a while but curiously I get way less of it nowadays...

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